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Jacques-Emile Blanche's painting from 1910 shows the view from Ludgate Circus, looking down towards St Paul’s. The foreground is crowded with hansom cabs and motor buses; the horse-drawn bus being a rare sight by this time. A steam train crosses Ludgate Hill railway bridge (this was demolished in 1990 to make way for the Thameslink.) Blanche painted many views of London, where he kept a studio from 1905. He used a four-wheeled vehicle as an extra studio from which he could make finished pictures of the city. See the painting on free display at Tate Britain. http://bit.ly/2LmCb36

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'I don’t see why you shouldn’t be filling yourself up, making yourself happy... Feasting on beauty' - Gillian Ayres OBE (1930-2018) Delight in Ayres' joyful paintings in a free display of the artist's work at Tate Britain: http://bit.ly/2LAoFcv

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What's your favourite month of the year? English painter Peter Brook made a lithograph for each one. Take a look here: http://bit.ly/2ZpMEEK 🐑

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WORK OF THE WEEK: Edward Wadsworth's 'Bronze Ballet' is a harbour scene based on Le Havre in Northern France. Although this is a peaceful scene, it was painted during the early years of the Second World War, in Maresfield in Sussex. From there, Wadsworth could hear the bombing of French ports by the German forces. Wadsworth was interested in animism – giving life to inanimate objects. Here the forms of the ships’ propellers suggest movement, or a dance, while also hinting at the function they will perform out at sea. See the painting on free display at Tate Britain. http://bit.ly/32cAQTp

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ART WORDS: 'Op art' was a major development of painting in the 1960s that used geometric forms to create visual effects, also drawing on colour theory and the physiology and psychology of perception. The effects range from the subtle to the disturbing and disorienting. Bridget Riley, one of the leading figures of the movement, said that ‘the eye should feel caressed and soothed, experience frictions and ruptures, glide and drift.’ Bridget Riley, Untitled [Fragment 5/8] 1965, on free display at Tate Liverpool. http://bit.ly/32kB5ff

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By 1794 William Blake had invented a method of printing in relief from etched plates, which gave him control over the style, production and publishing of his own books. He begun applying coloured pigments to his printing plates and printing some of the designs in his books as separate coloured images. 'Visions of the Daughters of Albion' was an illuminated book with eight designs which Blake first advertised in 1793, aged 36. The illustration will be shown in a major exhibition of Blake's watercolours, paintings and prints, opening 11 September at Tate Britain. Book tickets here: http://bit.ly/2Hzl11b William Blake, Frontispiece to 'Visions of the Daughters of Albion' c.1795, Tate Purchased with the assistance of a special grant from National Gallery & donations from Art Fund, Lord Duveen and others.

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Join Edward Richards at Tate Modern for a free British Sign Language tour of Olafur Eliasson's captivating installations inside the artist's unmissable exhibition: 'In Real Life'. 6 September from 7-8pm. http://bit.ly/2HxEu2o

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Where do you feel at home? 🏡 Harold Gilman painted this picture of his youngest sister Irene at his parents’ home in Kent. Harold Gilman, Edwardian Interior c.1907 https://bit.ly/2Lhxsjo

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Keith Haring worked quickly and confidently, with no preliminary sketches. He wanted to reach as many people as possible through his work. 'Art is nothing if you don’t reach every segment of the people,' he said. 'Art is for everybody.'⁣ Head to Tate Liverpool for a major exhibition of the artist's short and spectacular career, devoted to creating a truly public art: http://bit.ly/2HzvuJY ⁣ Documenta, Kassel, June 1982, Keith Haring Foundation

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Looking for lunchtime inspiration? Join us every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday at Tate Britain for a 15-minute artwork talk at 1.15pm. Each Tate Guide has a different talk so you can come as often as you like and learn something new each time! Talks are free and the artwork changes every month. September's artwork is William Holman Hunt's Our English Coasts, 1852 (‘Strayed Sheep’) 🐑 http://bit.ly/2LdiQ4t

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Takis at Tate Modern

Over his 70-year career, Takis (Panayiotis Vassilakis, 1925–2019) created some of the most innovative art of the 20th century. His work seeks out the essential poetry and beauty of the universe, from antennae-like sculptures to musical magnetic devices. See a major exhibition dedicated to his life's work before 27 October at Tate Modern. http://bit.ly/2Kotl4q

Takis at Tate Modern
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‘In my work I often use geometry as a tool to remove subjective decision-making. By withdrawing my own formal agency, I make space for the viewer’s agency, and make the work more about how you see it.’ – Olafur Eliasson Join the Studio Olafur Eliasson team today at 3pm LIVE from their Berlin studio where they'll be talking all things geometry. What would you like to ask the studio team? Comment below! The broadcast will be projected live inside the exhibition at Tate Modern, and live on SOETV 📺 (Studio Olafur Eliasson TV). Click here to watch: http://bit.ly/2LcnNdR Thank you Lucy Hamidzadeh for the photo!

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