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Spring's Military History

Murphy Street, Wangaratta, Australia
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Spring's Military History is set up to research the service history of servicemen and women from World War one and Two. Spring's Military History provides research for those who wish to know more about a relatives military service in World War One or Two. It also provides Battlefield Touring Itineraries for those wishing to "Follow in their Footsteps" and retrace the wartime movements of service personnel. Photos from Spring's Military History's postToday is the 7th of December, and according to Franklin D Roosevelt, US President in 1941, ‘a date that will live in infamy.’ For this was the date, 75 years ago today that the Japanese launched their attack on the American naval base in Pearl Harbor. This drew America into a war which was now truly a World War.
Often America is scoffed at, that in World War One it only entered the war in 1917, 3 years after it had started and World War Two in 1941, 2 years after it had started. Australia had been there from the start on both accounts. Our first causalities in World War One occurred in September 1914, one month after the war began and in World War Two, by the end of 1941 Australians had been fighting in the Battle of Britain, the Mediterranean and North Africa (most notably at the Siege of Tobruk).
As Australians we need to make sure that we don’t get a too Australian-centric view of the war and keep in mind other factors that helped shape the outcome, especially when it comes to viewing our Allies across the Pacific.

We should be extremely proud and never forget the Australian campaign to slow down, stop and then reverse the Japanese drive to Port Moresby across the Owen Stanley Ranges using the Kokoda Trail. Without the bravery, sacrifice and sheer determination of those Australian soldiers there is no doubt that Port Moresby would have been taken and most likely Papua New Guinea come under full Japanese occupation.
A few factors that we should also never forget: Had the US Navy not won the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942 the Japanese would have invaded and taken Port Moresby by a seaward approach. Therefore the Kokoda campaign would never had happened. The Battle of the Coral Sea was the first naval battle where the two navies never saw each other. The fight being waged by carrier based aircraft. Projecting this new style of naval warfare forward the US produced 17 Essex Class Aircraft Carriers (capable of holding 90-100 planes) before the end of the war with another 7 under construction. It also produced over 100 other carriers of smaller classes.
In August 1942 (at the height of the Kokoda Campaign) the US Marines made their first amphibious landing of the war in the Solomon Islands. This battle ensued until the end of the year. This protracted battle took priority in Japanese resources and drew in thousands of Japanese troops, hundreds of planes and many ships which had they been not heading towards the Solomons, would  have forced the issue more in Papua New Guinea.

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Are you looking to travel to Gallipoli and/or the Western Front in 2017? Or do you know someone who is? This year will be the 100th Anniversaries of the Battles of Bullecourt and Passchendaele. If so point them in the direction of Spring's Military History. Here I am at Gallipoli, for the Centenary of the landing in 2015, pointing out significant features in the landscape behind Anzac Cove to a gentleman who was there. — Products shown: Personal Battlefield Tour Itinerary .

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Spring's Military History

Bomana War Cemetery, Port Moresby

Spring's Military History
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Photos from Spring's Military History's post

Today is the 7th of December, and according to Franklin D Roosevelt, US President in 1941, ‘a date that will live in infamy.’ For this was the date, 75 years ago today that the Japanese launched their attack on the American naval base in Pearl Harbor. This drew America into a war which was now truly a World War. Often America is scoffed at, that in World War One it only entered the war in 1917, 3 years after it had started and World War Two in 1941, 2 years after it had started. Australia had been there from the start on both accounts. Our first causalities in World War One occurred in September 1914, one month after the war began and in World War Two, by the end of 1941 Australians had been fighting in the Battle of Britain, the Mediterranean and North Africa (most notably at the Siege of Tobruk). As Australians we need to make sure that we don’t get a too Australian-centric view of the war and keep in mind other factors that helped shape the outcome, especially when it comes to viewing our Allies across the Pacific. We should be extremely proud and never forget the Australian campaign to slow down, stop and then reverse the Japanese drive to Port Moresby across the Owen Stanley Ranges using the Kokoda Trail. Without the bravery, sacrifice and sheer determination of those Australian soldiers there is no doubt that Port Moresby would have been taken and most likely Papua New Guinea come under full Japanese occupation. A few factors that we should also never forget: Had the US Navy not won the Battle of the Coral Sea in May 1942 the Japanese would have invaded and taken Port Moresby by a seaward approach. Therefore the Kokoda campaign would never had happened. The Battle of the Coral Sea was the first naval battle where the two navies never saw each other. The fight being waged by carrier based aircraft. Projecting this new style of naval warfare forward the US produced 17 Essex Class Aircraft Carriers (capable of holding 90-100 planes) before the end of the war with another 7 under construction. It also produced over 100 other carriers of smaller classes. In August 1942 (at the height of the Kokoda Campaign) the US Marines made their first amphibious landing of the war in the Solomon Islands. This battle ensued until the end of the year. This protracted battle took priority in Japanese resources and drew in thousands of Japanese troops, hundreds of planes and many ships which had they been not heading towards the Solomons, would have forced the issue more in Papua New Guinea. American Industry was brought to full capacity during World War Two. The scale of the ship building programme was immense. At it’s peak it had over 12 million men under arms. The production of aircraft from the US was a major factor in victory in both theatres of operation, Europe and the Pacific. Here are some staggering production stats, over 10,000 Lightnings; over 18,000 B-24 Liberators; 10,000 B-25 Mitchells; 12,500 Corsairs; over 15,000 Mustangs, nearly 13,000 B-17 Flying Fortress’; over 15,000 Thunderbolts; 10,000 Avengers and over 12,000 Hellcats plus many more. In this new era of warfare where both aircraft carriers and aircraft in general were both critical for victory America certainly brought more than its fair share to the table. By attacking Pearl Harbor and not completely destroying the US Pacific Fleet in one strike, the Japanese drew America out of its isolationist slumber and started a long industrial war which once engaged America would fight its way to Victory. The culmination of which the people of Tokyo, Hiroshima and Nagasaki paid dearly. When we reflect on the peace that Australia enjoys we must make ourselves aware of the full story.

Photos from Spring's Military History's post
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Photos from Spring's Military History's post

P-40 Kittyhawk at Wangaratta Airport today.

Photos from Spring's Military History's post
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Spring's Military History's cover photo

Spring's Military History's cover photo
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Spring's Military History

Spring's Military History
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